Top Minnesota Lakes
Lake Mille Lacs
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Lake of the Woods
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Lake Minnetonka
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Leech Lake
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Lake Vermilion
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Lake Winnibigoshish
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Boundary Waters
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Cass Lake
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Lake Superior
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Whitefish Chain of Lakes
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Otter Tail Lake
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Gull Lake
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Upper Red Lake
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Rainy Lake
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Detroit Lake
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Pokegama Lake
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Lake Osakis
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Lake Miltona
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Lake Waconia
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Big Stone Lake
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Lake Traverse
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Lake Pepin
Minnesota Counties
Aitkin County Lakes
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Anoka County Lakes
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Becker County Lakes
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Benton County Lakes
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Beltrami County Lakes
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Blue Earth County Lakes
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Brown County Lakes
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Carlton County Lakes
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Carver County Lakes
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Cass County Lakes
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Chisago County Lakes
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Clearwater County Lakes
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Cook County Lakes
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Cottonwood County Lakes
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Crow Wing County Lakes
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Dakota County Lakes
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Douglas County Lakes
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Freeborn County Lakes
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Grant County Lakes
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Hennepin County Lakes
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Hubbard County Lakes
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Isanti County Lakes
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Itasca County Lakes
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Jackson County Lakes
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Kanabec County Lakes
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Kandiyohi County Lakes
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Lake County Lakes
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Le Sueur County Lakes
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Lincoln County Lakes
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Lyon County Lakes
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Martin County Lakes
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McLeod County Lakes
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Meeker County Lakes
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Morrison County Lakes
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Murray County Lakes
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Otter Tail County Lakes
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Pine County Lakes
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Polk County Lakes
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Pope County Lakes
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Ramsey County Lakes
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Rice County Lakes
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Scott County Lakes
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Sherburne County Lakes
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St. Louis County Lakes
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Stearns County Lakes
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Todd County Lakes
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Washington County Lakes
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Wright County Lakes

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Welcome to

Minnesota Lakes

Minnesota is known around the world as the "Land of 10,000 Lakes".  Most of these amazing lakes are located in Northern Minnesota which also features the Boundary Waters Canoe Area.  With incredible fishing lakes like: Lake of the Woods, Lake Vermilion, Lake Mille Lacs, and Leech Lake, you are sure to catch your limit on these and most Minnesota Lakes. Visit major lake hotspots like the Brainerd Lakes Area, Grand Rapids Lakes Area, Alexandria Lakes Area, Park Rapids Lakes Area and the Bemidji Lakes Area. Minnesota Lakes have outstanding Walleye Fishing, Northern Pike Fishing, Bass Fishing, and there is always the chance at a trophy Muskie. Make sure to check the local Minnesota Fishing Reports before heading out on the lake to find where the fish are biting. Once you spend your fishing vacation at one of our great Minnesota Resorts you will find it's a place you don't want to leave.  With so many lakes there are also Lake Homes and Cabins For Sale throughout Minnesota. Whether you enjoy fishing or just a quiet boat ride, you will find beautiful Minnesota Lakes in every corner of the state. MinnesotaLakes.net is your source for the most detailed Lake and Fishing information for your next Minnesota Fishing Trip.
Minnesota Fishing

 

Minnesota Walleye Fishing

 

Minnesota features outstanding Walleye fishing on many lakes and trophy catches can be made throughout the year. Walleyes like moving water, even if it is only a slight current. In the spring, Walleye will congregate where there is a faster flow of water. Towards summer Walleyes tend to disburse throughout the lake with some fish remaining near faster water. Walleyes prefer feeding under low light conditions. On bright days action tends to be better in the morning and evenings. Overcast days will typically produce better Walleye fishing than on bright clear days. Always fish the shorelines that the wind is blowing to. Fish jigs tipped with natural bait, crankbait lures or spinners close to the bottom.

 

Top Minnesota Walleye Fishing Lakes

 

Lake of the Woods

Lake Vermilion

Lake Mille Lacs

Leech Lake

Upper Red Lake

Otter Tail Lake

Cass Lake

Lake Winnie

Rainy Lake

Gull Lake

Pokegama Lake

 

 

Minnesota Muskie Fishing

 

The Muskie is a true trophy fish in Minnesota Lakes because of the patience it takes to catch one and the huge sizes they can grow to. Muskies like weeds and camouflaging structure from which they can launch a sudden, short distanced attack. A 10-12 inch sucker is tough to beat for big muskies. Try fishing just before a front that's accompanied by an east wind,especially in the summer for a trophy Muskie catch. Here are a few more tips for successful Muskie fishing:

1. Jerkbaits - If a muskie follows a jerkbait when you're making short hard twitches, don't abandon those movements when you get to the boat. Keep slow twitching right into the turn, this is where a muskie often tags a jerkbait.

2. Minnowbaits - You can work these baits either fast like a bucktail or with slow twitches like a jerkbait. Stay consistent. If the fish follows on twitches, keep twitching. If the muskie follows on a fast retrieve, maintain that speed.

3. Bucktails - As soon as you spot a fish on the retrieve, speed up. This can trigger a strike before you reach the boat. Once in the 8, keep thing nice and smooth--speed up in the straight stretches, and slow down on the turn. Keep the turn big and wide and if the fish won't commit, give the bait a twitch or two.

4. Long Rods - Use 8-9 foot rods, which get the lure out away from the boat, as well as deeper. Long fishing rods also ease wide turns while the extra length allows adding more speed in the straightaways.

 

Top Minnesota Muskie Fishing Lakes

 

Lake of the Woods

Lake Mille Lacs

Leech Lake

Lake Vermilion

Lake Minnetonka

Cass Lake

Detroit Lake

 

 

Muskie and Pike Fishing

 

Location of both Muskie and Northern Pike in Minnesota Lakes can vary greatly throughout the seasons. Furthermore, the bigger fish will often be working entirely different areas after spawning than the more numerous small to medium-sized fish. Habitat preferences and food choices can vary greatly between small and large specimens of both species.

 

When both Muskie and Pike are present in the same lakes in relatively good populations, a wide variety of locational patterns often exists. A school of aggressive smaller pike might control a large portion of a big, weedy bay in the late spring/early summer, but a single patch of weeds growing in deeper water at the mouth of this bay will likely hold at least one lunker muskie. A cluster of small islands with some weedy saddles and scattered rock might hold pike just about anywhere. However, a muskie working the same island cluster will usually be situated right where the wind and wave action first come into contact with weeds or rocks. In other words, muskie will usually be on the most opportune ambush point on any given spot. Because of their generally larger size, they will dominate and consequently, get their pick of choice spots.

 

Outsized lunker pike carry this same dominance in some cases. This is especially true in waters where no muskie are present. A single big pike, much larger than the rest of the pack, will usually set up a temporary feeding station on the very best position of ambush. The rest of the pack will scatter along secondary choices. Once this pike is caught, another big one will often take its place within a short time. This same "choice spot" principle also works with muskie in Minnesota Lakes.

 

 

Minnesota Northern Pike Fishing

 

Northern Pike grow to very large sizes in Minnesota Lakes and there are many great pike fishing lakes throughout the state. Northern Pike like weeds and structure close to deeper water. They will also suspend when the water becomes warm close to shore. Northern Pike are very aggressive when they are hungry and will hit any lure within sight. The large pike tend to feed like their cousin the Muskie. They will feed, fill up and then digest their food over several days. During this digesting period they will not strike at anything. Spinners and spoons are good Northern Pike lures on Minnesota Lakes.

 

Top Minnesota Northern Pike Fishing Lakes


Lake Vermilion

Lake Mille Lacs

Leech Lake

Lake of the Woods

Lake Winnie

Lake Minnetonka

Rainy Lake

Pokegama Lake

Cass Lake

 

Minnesota Bass Fishing

 

You can find Largemouth Bass, Smallmouth Bass, and Rock Bass in most Minnesota Lakes. Smallmouth Bass like rocks, weeds, brush and underwater reefs. They prefer gravel or rock bottoms and are known for being great fighters. During the warm Minnesota summer months, big Smallmouth Bass seem to turn on when it's really hot and muggy and the barometer is falling. If you can fish just before a storm moves in, you'll have a better shot at a trophy bass. As for water clarity, 3-4 feet of visibility is a good place to start. Clear water often makes Smallmouth Bass more skittish. You can also find Largemouth Bass around weedbeds, brush, stumps and logs and worm-like lures can produce nice catches. Largemouth Bass love to hang out under heavy cover in the warm summer months. Here are a few tips on how to land soft, precise underhand casts for landing that big Largemouth Bass:

1. The Setup - Heavy-cover fishing requires strong line - 20 to 25 pound-test mono. Start with a 1-ounce lure in your left hand about even with the reel. While keeping slight tension on the line with your left hand, put the reel in free-spool and press your right thumb against the spool to prevent any movement.

2. The Swing - Hold the rod at waist level, extend straight out in front of you. Your casting-arm elbow should be bent and relaxed. Let go of the lure to start a pendulum-like swing. As the lure swings, raise the rod upward and outward by about a foot. Release thumb pressure on the spool so the lure flies with a low trajectory. If it lands right in front of you, you released the spool too soon. A high-flying lure means you let go too late.

3. The Landing - As the lure reaches the target, thumb the spool to slow its flight and lower the rod slightly so the bait hits the water with a gentle blip. Above all, remember that you're swinging the lure to make this cast, not throwing it.

 

 

 

 

Where To Find Fish in Minnesota Lakes

 

If an angler is to catch fish with any degree of consistency in Minnesota Lakes, it is essential that you present your lure or bait "where the fish are". Therefore it is important to know the fish's habitat as well as its habits. Structure, both above and below the water's surface, are clues to the habitat of game fish. Other features such as birds, fellow fishermen, and water temperature, are also indicators of the location of the fish.

 

Points

Points attract bait fish and provide shelter from the sun's rays for all game fish. Fish the side of the point adjacent to the deep areas in the shade. Find and fish the end of the point particularly if it has a good dropoff.

 

Islands

The reasons for fishing a point could also be applied to an island. The downstream end of an island provides a backwater in which fish will lie in wait for food being drifted into the eddy.

 

Sunken Islands

Sunken islands with deep water adjacent to at least one side are excellent fish habitat. If the island is covered with weeds, stumps or boulders, it could be one of the best spots in the lake. Sonar is a great help in locating these hotspots.

 

Narrows

Narrows between lakes and in rivers cause an increase in the rate of water flow which usually results in a cutout channel. These channels provide oxygenated water and shelter which attracts fish.

 

Overhanging Banks

Where a current is present, such as at the bend of a river or near a high bank, the bank is often undercut. Food is washed into these undercuts which attracts fish. They also offer shelter from the sun's rays. They are great fish-holding areas.

 

Dams, Falls and Rapids

Below these structures and geo-physical areas the water is highly oxygenated which draws fish, particularly Walleyes and Smallmouth Bass. Spring is the best time for these areas. These are also excellent areas to fish in the summer months particularly in the evening and early morning.

 

Bay Entrances

The mouth of a bay often has a sand or gravel bar running from one side to the other. Fish migrate onto these bars to feed, especially in the evening and during the night.

 

Weed Beds

Weed beds provide shelter, safety and food for game fish, and as such are "fish magnets". Northern Pike and Largemouth Bass are notorious for spending a lot of time in the weeds.

 

Channel Markers

These markers denote the edge of a navigation channel which is usually one of the deeper areas in a lake. A marker is quite often placed over a sunken shoal. Fish around these channel markers, especially on the deep side of a shoal or bar.

 

Inlet Streams

Streams and rivers entering a lake bring food to the fish as well as oxygenated water. These are superb angling areas, particularly if weeds or other shelter features are present. Rivers and streams are good areas to fish during and after the spawning runs.

 

Minnesota Fishing Reports

 

Minnesota Walleye Fishing

 

 

Most experts agree Walleyes were originally a fish of rivers. Obviously, they have adapted to life in the type of closed environments provided by lakes. True to their heritage, however, Walleyes favor rivers or streams as spawning sites when they are available. Walleyes also spawn very successfully on windswept, shallow lake shoals providing proper bottom content is available. Walleyes in Minnesota Lakes can adapt to life in or around timber, weeds, brush, rocks, or even open water, and will utilize a variety of prey species as food. In any body of water, Walleyes will not all be doing the same thing at the same time. It isn't unusual to find fish using weed edges, deep rocks, gravel humps and feeder creek areas, all at the same time. Walleye location in Minnesota Lakes is always an interesting challenge. The fish will often move out to a hard bottom edge during the day and move towards shore during the evening. During certain periods they may also suspend in open water in Minnesota Lakes. Time and time again, you'll find the Walleye location depends on a host of interrelated factors that can vary considerably from one body of water to another. One factor remains constant, however. The Walleye needs to eat. Except during the spawning period, the fish always relates to forage of some sort.

 

While the Post-spawn Period is characterized as a resting stage when fish scatter and feed little, a change is imminent. The Walleyes bodies need nourishment, and the resumption of regular feeding activities indicates the beginning of a new pattern called the Pre-summer Period. This period is the beginning of the fish's prime growth time for the whole year. During this and the Summer Peak Period walleyes grow the most in length, though not necessarily in weight. During the post-spawn recuperation period, the Walleye changes from a fish primarily preoccupied with the reproduction ritual to a fish primarily interested in food and comfort. When water temperatures reach the high 50's or low 60's F, you can usually assume they are back to biting. Pre-summer is a time of emerging weedgrowth and a developing food chain. Pre-summer is a time when fish are often hard to pinpoint but it is one of the most effective periods of the year for night fishing. More Walleyes are caught at this time of the year in Minnesota Lakes by the average fisherman than at any other time, largely because more patterns are available. Slowly, though, as water temperatures continue climbing upwards, there is a gradual tendency for Walleyes to start keying on specific food sources. Basically, Pre-summer is a time of transition when a Minnesota Lake transforms from the cooler environment of spring to the warmer environment of summer. Fish begin regrouping and patterns begin to emerge.

 

As the summer progresses in Minnesota, the Pre-summer Period develops into the Summer Peak - a short period of fast-action fishing. The final trigger that pushes Walleyes from the Pre-summer Period into the short-lived period of the intense feeding of Summer Peak always appears to be the same: Namely, a span of relatively calm, very warm weather. In many cases this is the first really hot, summer-type weather of the season - and more importantly, the first hot nights of early summer. The Summer Peak in Minnesota is one of the best times of the year for peak Walleye fishing. Not only do you encounter schools of fish, but schools of aggressively feeding Walleyes.

 

 

 

Minnesota Trout Fishing

 

Minnesota is blessed with an abundance of fish and fishing lakes. While species like Muskie, Northern Pike, Walleye and Bass might get more attention from the majority of anglers, the passion of the local Trout anglers dates back to the state's earliest pioneers. Not every lake in Minnesota can support every species of fish. Just as you wouldn't expect to find a Walleye in a farm pond, Trout cannot survive in lakes that do not provide the right combination of water temperature, cover, and food sources. Despite the variety of size, depth, water clarity, structure, forage base, and vegetation in Minnesota Lakes, it is a reflection of the Trout's particularly special requirements that there are only about 200 lakes in the state that can consistently provide everything Trout need to survive and carry over from year to year. Popular Trout Fishing species in Minnesota Lakes include Rainbow Trout, Lake Trout, Brown Trout, and Brook Trout.

 

As with any animal, Trout need oxygen to survive. Trout prefer water temperature somewhere in the range of 50-68 F. Water temperature much below that range cause a Trout's metabolism to slow down, leading to less frequent feeding and slower growth rates. Water temperatures much above that range will place stress on Trout, and can lead to increased fish mortality. Part of successful fishing for Trout in Minnesota Lakes will require searching out the portions of a lake which provide adequate oxygen and suitable temperatures for Trout. Trout prefer areas with cover in lakes including drowned trees or thick weed beds along the shoreline. Mid-lake structures such as drop-offs, rock piles, and submerged timber are also Trout spots in Minnesota Lakes.

 

Recommended Fishing Websites

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New York Fishing

 


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